GoodLife Goals: Futerra’s style of making the SDGs actionable for all

I stumbled on the GoodLife Goals sometime last week and I could not help but put down my thoughts about them. The GoodLife Goals were carved out of the sustainable development goals by one of the co-founders (Solitaire Townsend) of Futerra, a hybrid change agency that is committed to making sustainable development so desirable it becomes normal.

The GLGs caught my attention because each of the SDGs was expressed in simpler terms that even a 4-year old would understand them easily. Explaining the SDGs in layman terms could not have come at a better time because the SDGs present a group of cumbersome things to do for the everyday man/woman. On the other hand, businesses and governments can align their strategies and actions to the SDGs. Let’s take a look at the revision by Futerra.

So what are the GoodLife Goals?

According to the Good Life Goals manual, they are a set of personal actions that people around the world can take to help support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They are lifestyle asks for individuals that are carefully aligned with the SDGs 169 targets and indicators.

The SDGs were simply broken down into actionable terms that everyone can live by as you would see in the images below.

Image credit: wbcsd.org
Fun emojis to depict the SDGs. These would be easy to understand by anyone.
Image credit: UNESCO
Governments and businesses would not find this too hard to work with. They would, however, find it easier to implement when they adopt the GoodLife Goals.

The images are self-explanatory. Each SDG has a corresponding GoodLife Goal to explain it further. For more details, you can download the manual and the pack of actions. 

Thank you, Solitaire!

This is to say a big thank you to Solitaire Townsend for “hacking” the SDGs. Want to know more about Solitaire and her work at Futerra, click here

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